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Federal Crimes Pretrial Procedures - Continued

 

Q. I received a Summons to Appear ordering me to appear at the U.S. District Courthouse. What should I do?
 
A. The summons is your notice that a criminal case has been filed against you in federal court. You must respond to the summons and appear in court on the date and time designated. As soon as you receive the summons, you should retain an attorney to represent you. If you cannot afford an attorney, you should contact the Federal Public Defender's Office. A Deputy Federal Public Defender (DFPD) will have you complete a financial affidavit to determine your inability to pay for an attorney. This affidavit will accompany your request asking the court to provide you an attorney at the court's cost.

If there is any chance that you might be imprisoned or put on probation, the court will make sure that you have an attorney before conducting any proceedings relating to your criminal case. But even before proceedings begin, an attorney can assist in protecting your rights and gathering information about your case. An attorney can also refer you to Pre-Trial Services which recommends bond and the conditions of your continued release pending final resolution of your case.
 
Q. I received a letter from the U.S. Attorney's Office telling me that I am the target of a federal criminal investigation. What should I do?
 
A. You should contact a criminal defense attorney immediately. The "subject" or "target" of a grand jury investigation is any person who might be charged with a crime as a result of the grand jury proceedings. You should not contact the U. S. Attorney's Office by yourself, but instead have your attorney call them to determine the government's interest in you. A criminal defense attorney can protect important rights for you, including your right against self incrimination, and may be able to successfully negotiate immunity in exchange for your testimony.

If you cannot afford an attorney, you should contact the Federal Public Defender's Office. A Deputy Federal Public Defender (DFPD) will have you complete a financial affidavit to determine your inability to pay for an attorney. This affidavit will accompany your request asking the court to provide you an attorney at the court's cost.
 
   
   
 
 





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